Media Trust

#MediaScot – a focus for new community media

Leading figures from across Scotland’s new media sector are gathering at an Edinburgh school today (Friday 22 April) in a unique opportunity to learn from each other about how they can take more control over local news gathering and media production for their benefit of communities across the country.

The “Media in Scotland’s Communities” conference is taking place at Castlebrae Community High School in Craigmillar, organised by the charity Media Trust, where I have been working since late 2013, and the University of the West of Scotland.

The event brings together dozens of media activists, writers and publishers, journalists and academics as well as young film makers and students from Scotland and the UK to begin to map the future for new community-based media in the country.

The event marks the final stages of Media Trust’s 3-year flagship programme, Do Something Brilliant, which has been funded by the Big Lottery Fund, and which has delivered dozens of specialist training workshops to charities, social enterprises and small businesses in every region of Scotland since the project began in 2013.

I have had the unique privilege of travelling from Orkney and Lewis, to Ayrshire and the Borders either to run one of numerous training sessions or to film editions of the Community Channel programmes which I’ve produced, with the help of some outstanding young presenters and reporters, such as Farah Bradford and Ted Simpson (pictured, below).

Farah + Ted

Farah Bradford and Ted Simpson presented the March 2016 edition of the Community Channel’s Do Something Brilliant programme from Craigmillar.

However, we chose to locate this event in Craigmillar because this part of Edinburgh has been the focus of a key element of my work in the last year, assisting in setting up the area’s new hyperlocal news website, the Chronicle Online.

A key opening contribution to the day will come from Kathryn Geels, whose extensive study of the current state, and future of hyperlocals across the UK, Destination Local has just been completed.

Participants at the conference will be running masterclasses and technical workshops in how to produce sophisticated media materials on smartphones, opportunities for crowdfunding new media in Scotland, and the role of education in helping communities take control of media and news in their own areas.

Myself and the other co-organisers, Jennifer Jones and David McGillivrary from UWS, believe the event will help set the national agenda for the future of community media – and new media more widely – both in Scotland and the UK.

As well as the technical workshops, film screenings and panel discussions, there will be a number of stalls provided by partner organisations such as the Thistle Foundation and Digital Sentinel.

The University of the West of Scotland’s mobile campus will be based at the school for the day and will be both an editing space for the journalism students and young film-makers taking part as well as the intake point for contributions from wider flung hyperlocal websites, such as The Bristol Cable.

IMG_2193

Castlebrae Community High School headteacher, Norma Prentice

Our enormous thanks go to both the staff and students at Castlebrae for their generosity in agreeing to host the event, despite having also to accommodate students from the local primary school which has been evacuated because of the Edinburgh city-wide schools PFI reconstruction work.

Advertisements

My name is…

Tommy Whitelaw lobbies MSPs during a recent event at the Scottish Parliament

Tommy Whitelaw lobbies MSPs during a recent event at the Scottish Parliament

Joan Whitelaw was diagnosed with vascular dementia in 2007.

When that happened, her son Tommy parked his previous life to care for her until she died in 2012.

Those five years have informed his new life.

Tommy Whitelaw is now almost constantly on the road talking to health care professionals, medical students and hundreds of others across the NHS in Scotland and England, telling the story of how one small gesture by a nurse visitor to his mother’s home – when both she and Tommy felt at their most isolated and near to despair – made a colossal difference to how he was able to cope with her declining health and mounting care needs.

Amidst the sometimes harrowing details of how Joan Whitelaw’s physical world changed forever as dementia took its toll, Tommy says the greatest tragedy is how the illness erased a great love story from her memory: how she met and married Tommy’s father and their lives together.

It is an experience of loneliness, of a patient’s world shrinking – sometimes to anonymity – which has also informed a new campaign to try to help restore dignity and self-esteem to hospital patients.

Kate Grainger is a consultant doctor who is also terminally ill with cancer.

Her campaign hopes to encourage NHS staff to introduce themselves by name to help build a relationship with their patients.

She says: “I firmly believe it is not just about knowing someone’s name, but it runs much deeper.

“It is about making a human connection, beginning a therapeutic relationship and building trust.

“In my mind it is the first rung on the ladder to providing compassionate care.”

That connection is something which healthcare professionals in Scotland say they have already begun to make across dementia care.

Ruth Mantle, consultant nurse with Alzheimer Scotland, said: “[It’s about] taking the time to find out what really matters to that person, who matters to that person, who’s the best person to speak to, to get that information.

“We use tools such as the ‘getting to know me’ tool up here in Scotland.

“So, absolutely we can all make those small, little differences to include someone’s experience.”

Pledges to ‘make a difference’ are at the centre of Tommy Whitelaw’s Dementia Carer Voices campaign, which features in the latest edition of Brilliant Scotland series on the Community Channel.

When we filmed a lobby of MSPs at the Scottish Parliament organised by Tommy Whitelaw’s campaign and Alliance Scotland, the new First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon told us: “Every single, individual pledge that’s made adds up to a transformation in how we care for people with dementia and people who care for them.

“And as long as I’m in politics and as long as I have got any influence in government my pledge is to help and support people who are working so hard to make life better for people with dementia.”

According to official estimates, there are more than 650,000 unpaid carers in Scotland.

Campaigners believe there are in fact tens of thousands more – many of them may not even realise they are a carer.

They hope new legislation – due in the Spring – will help improve conditions for carers across Scotland, through providing individual Support Plans, non-judgemental care assessments and greater responsibilities on local authorities to provide cover to allow carers to take short breaks.

Many also believe one single change could everything for carers: a living wage.

Taken together, they say, both elements would allow carers to manage their role and have a life outside caring.

Said Tommy Whitelaw: “Over and above any policy or strategy, it’s people who change lives.

“And I think the highlight so far on the tour is just meeting those incredible people who are passionate – and compassionate – and want to really do their best to care for people.

“And we’re trying to help them with that story, but also to find out the little things that get in the way of allowing them to do that.

“So along with the pledges we’re asking people: is there anything that would stop you fulfilling this pledge?

“And if there’s a way we can support them, to allow them to fulfil it, we’ll do that.”

Brilliant Scotland will be repeated on Saturday 7 February at 06.00am.

The programme is available on-demand on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/CommunityChannelTV

Navigating consent

Media Trust filmed a training session on consent run by the Rape and Abuse Support group in Aberdeen

Media Trust filmed a recent training session on consent run by the Rape and Abuse Support group in Aberdeen

Recent research by the National Union of Students has found that almost one-in-ten women have said “no” to sex but have been ignored.

It comes amid a vital debate over the issue of sexual consent, triggered by the new guidelines issued last week to police and prosecutors by the Director of Public Prosecutions, Alison Saunders.

The guidelines will require investigating officers to ask alleged rapists whether they claim their victim had consented to sex and if so, how they knew she had given consent.

Filming at a recent training session for students in Aberdeen organised by the Rape and Abuse Support group put the guidance into sharp perspective for me.

The RAS student ambassador Tashana Khan said: “Unfortunately a lot of students around the UK and here in Aberdeen have reported that they have been victims of things like sexual harassment, ranging from street harassment and cat-calling, inappropriate touching in clubs all the way to serious forms of sexual assault.

“So I think that’s another reason why we need to talk about these things and promote active, enthusiastic consent.”

The idea of “affirmative” or “enthusastic” consent has been part of the lexicon of campaigners against sexual violence for some time and groups such as those in Aberdeen will welcome its endorsement by one of the UK’s most senior legal officers.

According to the Crown Prosecution Service, toolkits to prosecutors will “spell out situations where a potential victim may have been unable to consent due to incapacity through drink or drugs, for example, or where consent could not reasonably be considered to have been given freely due to the unequal relationship of the parties involved. For example, if the suspect held a position of power over the potential victim – as a teacher, an employer, a doctor or a fellow gang member.”

When we filmed their training workshop for the latest edition of the #BrilliantScotland series on the Community Channel, RAS violence prevention workers also said that what should be a basic issue of assent is easily complicated by peer pressure, social mores, downright bullying or the inexperience of young students with drugs and alcohol.

RAS worker Francesca Bellei told us: “It is a very simple concept: ‘yes’ means yes and ‘no’ means no.

“But real life often presents us with situations that can seem more difficult than that to navigate.

“We also believe that there are very strong social constructions that tell us things about consent that may not be true.”

The students and the RAS facilitators went on to discuss how the law in Scotland is also changing – even though those changes are not coming quickly enough for some.

Reforms to the Scots law principles of corroboration are likely later this year.

These are partly in response to official figures which showed more than two thousand domestic abuse cases a year could not be prosecuted because of insufficient admissible evidence.

So the RAS campaigners hope their work among students and the wider public will help raise awareness of both consent and corroboration, to help put an end to blaming women for rape.

“For too long,” said Alison Saunders, “society has blamed victims for confusing the issue of consent.

“But it is not they who are confused, it is society itself and we must challenge that.

“Consent to sexual activity is not a grey area – in law it is clearly defined and must be given fully and freely.”

#BrilliantScotland 4 also reports from Fife on the hopes and concerns after last year’s #IndyRef of 16 and 17 year old school students who will become the first under-18 year olds to vote in a general election in the 2016 Scottish Parliament election.

Elsewhere in the programme, we spend time playing “frogs and sharks” with a daring and enthusiastic group of nursery school children learning to ride a bike as part of CTC Scotland’s fast-moving Play on Pedals project.

Brilliant Scotland is broadcast this evening at 9.00pm on the Community Channel, again tomorrow at 07.00am and will be repeated on Saturday 7 February at 06.00am.

The programme will also be available on-demand on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/CommunityChannelTV